Sunday, April 18, 2010

Justification

Via Justin Taylor's blog Doug Moo's 140 word summary of Justification.

The Bible pictures all human beings as defendants in a courtroom: a courtroom in which God is the judge and our sins constitute the evidence against us. The judge weighs the evidence and finds every single one of us guilty of sin and announces that we, therefore, must be condemned. The marvellous news of justification is that God has himself provided for us the means of escaping that condemnation: by responding to his gracious initiative in faith, we become joined with Christ, who died for us and was raised for us. We become joined to Christ, who takes on himself the penalty for our sin and covers us with the ‘righteousness’ that we need to reverse the verdict of condemnation and receive the verdict of ‘justified’, ‘right’ with God. And because we have been joined to Christ, the holy one, and have in that union received the gift of God’s powerful holy Spirit, we, who have been justified, also find our lives transformed so that we love God and neighbour.

4 comments:

ish said...

Glory to God!

Andrew Bowles said...

Hi Luke. Great to see you on Saturday.

I think the statement 'The Bible pictures all human beings as defendants in a courtroom: a courtroom in which God is the judge and our sins constitute the evidence against us' is questionable. I can't think offhand of any places in Scripture where this image is used when describing sin. Happy to be shown wrong, but I think there are a variety of other ways that the 'problem' could be described that would be more Biblical, eg. 'The Bible pictures humanity as an unfaithful wife who has run off from God and got herself in a terrible state', 'The Bible sees humanity as ontologically destined to die because of being expelled from the presence of God', 'Jesus described humans as being like two brothers who have different kinds of bad relationship with their father'.
That might alter the way the doctrine is construed, but you know, sola scriptura and all that. :)

Luke said...

Great question Andrew, should our summaries reflect the ideas or the actual language used in scripture? This question also has a wider application, when it comes to preaching and we use stories or illustrations not found in the text to convey the idea or emotion of the text.

Maybe this shows theology and exegesis have a symbiotic relationship.

arthurandtamie said...

Man, that hotly awaited new Counterpoints book is in the library... Race you to it... Actually, I'm way busy..! :D
A.