Thursday, February 3, 2011

Measuring Disasters


I ask this very respectfully and genuinely.  How do we measure disasters?  By their destructive power, casualties, economic losses or spiritual impact? All around the world, there are fires, riots, miscarriages of justice, landslides, storms and the persecution of Christians.  Even a secular philosophy needs to make a judgement call on which disasters are worth reporting on, fixing and responding to. So as Christians, in our churches, thinking about where to send our money, direct our attention and pray about, which disasters merit our attention?

[Picture of a church on the coast of Northern Queensland, © 2011. The Australian]

4 comments:

Marion said...

I financially support Christians in several place precisely for the reason you've stated in your article. Often they cannot get jobs, or get their kids into school, or have all rights taken from them.

Luke Isham said...

I wonder if disasters should be measured by their impact on local Christian communities? But I suspect that's a controversial opinion, although not an alien one since most disasters are measured by their impact on the Western world.

Jon said...

I find this a real issue, because in our media-saturated world (no to mention rain-saturated one) we have information about such huge need. We feel powerless in the face of huge global forces and it seems that nothing we do will make a difference. This makes it hard to make a good judgement about the use of our limited resources. But we need to make some judgement or other, because the alternative is to do nothing at all which can only be worse.

ish said...

What are we to take from the thought that disasters can provide positive life changing points for people making them see real worth as never before, plus a a life changing narrative for generations to follow. We abhor the disaster, do all we can to avoid it, but in some ways, is it sustenance?