Wednesday, November 14, 2012

Jesus in the Old Testament

I think Tim Keller gives the best summary of what our approach should be:
Don’t get to Christ artificially. This is a big subject of course, but I believe two of the best ways are (a) by identifying in your text one of the many inner-canonical themes that all climax in Christ (Don Carson’s language), and (b) identifying in your text some “Fallen Condition Focus,” some lack in humanity that only Christ can fill (Bryan Chapell’s language).
(Via the Resurgence blog.)

Comments and thoughts about Jesus in the Old Testament:
  • Rather than Old and New Testament we should be thinking pre and post Incarnation and pre and post Pentecost
  • God works contextually and progressively (eg Heb 11:13, 39-40)
  • I think in preaching and pastoral care we should arrive at Jesus more quickly than in our theological thinking and discussion

4 comments:

jamesanita.blogspot.com/ said...

G'day Luke

I like that link.

Also I like the comment and thought about: Rather than Old and New Testament we should be thinking pre and post Incarnation and pre and post Pentecost

I think this could be helpful and came out in a discussion I was in.

Cheers James

Mikey Lynch said...

pre incarnation avoids the error of talking about "Jesus" in OT, when God the Son is meant.

Steve Isham said...

I too think the "pre and post" incarnation and Pentecostal markers are much more apt than OT and NT.
Like you've unboxed the books. :)

Mikey. Jesus as incarnate God is in his coming unprecedented and unique, but is there harm in applying the name retrospectively in talking about the Son in the OT? ie now that we know etc.

Mikey Lynch said...

It is right in one sense (its called the "communication of attributes) but can lead to confusion when done too systematically. The opposite but equivalent danger is to speak of Mary as Mother of God or the Death of God.