Tuesday, March 18, 2014

Uncle Andrew (from the Magician's Nephew) on the demands of greatness

"Rotten?" said Uncle Andrew with a puzzled look. "Oh, I see. You mean that little boys ought to keep their promises. Very true: most right and proper, I'm sure, and I'm very glad you have been taught to do it. But of course you must understand that rules of that sort, however excellent they may be for little boys - and servants - and women - and even people in general, can't possibly be expect to apply to profound students and great thinkers and sages. No, Digory. Men like me, who posses hidden wisdom, are freed from common rules, just as we are cut off from common pleasures. Ours, my boy is a high and lonely destiny." As he said this he sighed and looked so grave and noble and mysterious that for a second Digory really thought he was saying something rather fine. But then he remembered the ugly look he had see on his Uncle's face the moment before Polly had vanished, and all at once he saw through Uncle Andrew's grand words.

Magician's Nephew by CS Lewis

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